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12" / LP

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1,500.00 ฿

John Coltrane ‎– First Meditations (For Quartet)

There have been many excellent Trane posthumous releases (commercialized in 77), but this one might just be the best ever. Graced with an unusual sleeve (especially for the Impulse! label), First Meditations was recorded in the last days of the first quartet, but obviously shelved, and later re-worked during the transition with the second quartet, with two drummers and two saxes. As this release’s name might indicate, this is the first version of the Meditations album that Trane recorded and released with his second classic quartet, but the tracks are played by the Tyner, Elvin and Jimmy quartet, and believe me, this is a much friendlier train of thoughts than the “official” album.

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600.00 ฿

Stanley Clarke ‎– School Days

Excellent jazz rock fusion album with a prominent role for the electric bass but also a role for the acoustic upright bass.
This album is different than other prominent bass jazz rock artists like Eberhard Weber and Pekka Pohjola. It is less folk and jazz influenced and has more funk and rock influences where Stanley actually plays chords on his bassguitar.

It has some Return to Forever-influences but it is clear that Stanley Clarke has a sound of his own. To augment the sound and colour of the songs, Stanley carefully picked the right musicians for each song, so the list of guests is long list. But the songs have a natural flow and fit together perfectly.

Also the addition of strings and brass makes it more than just a solo-bass album.

Highly recommended!

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1,000.00 ฿

Quincy Jones ‎– You've Got It Bad Girl

Review by Andy Kellman
Quincy Jones followed up Smackwater Jack and his supervision of Donny Hathaway's Come Back Charleston Blue soundtrack with this, a mixed bag that saw him inching a little closer toward the R&B-dominated approach that reached full stride on the following Body Heat and peaked commercially with The Dude. That said, the album's most notorious cut is "The Streetbeater" -- better known as the Sanford & Son theme, a novelty for most but also one of the greasiest, grimiest instrumental fusions of jazz and funk ever laid down -- while its second most noteworthy component is a drastic recasting of "Summer in the City," as heard in the Pharcyde's "Passin' Me By," where the frantic, bug-eyed energy of the Lovin' Spoonful original is turned into a magnetically lazy drift driven by Eddie Louis' organ, Dave Grusin's electric piano, and Valerie Simpson's voice. (Simpson gives the song a "Summertime"-like treatment.) Between that, the title song (a faithfully mellow version, with Jones' limited but subdued vocal lead), a medley of Aretha Franklin's "Daydreaming" and Ewan MacColl's "First Time Ever I Saw Your Face," and a light instrumental, roughly half the album is mood music, and it's offset with not just "The Streetbeater" but a large-scale take on "Manteca," a spooky-then-overstuffed "Superstition" (where the uncredited Billy Preston, Bill Withers, and Stevie Wonder are billed as "three beautiful brothers"), and the "Streetbeater" companion "Chump Change" (co-written with Bill Cosby). The best here can be had on comps, but the album is by no means disposable. [Given a straight reissue in early 2009 via Verve's Originals series.

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900.00 ฿

The Mar-Keys ‎– Memphis Experience

Review by Richie Unterberger
The Mar-Keys had a history of strange personnel changes; their previous LP (1969's Damifiknow!) had basically been Booker T. & the MG's-plus-horn section playing under the Mar-Keys name. Yet Memphis Experience was even stranger, demonstrating that the Mar-Keys at this point meant nothing more to Stax than a name that could be exploited. Three of the seven cuts were Bar-Kays outtakes that were scrapped when that band underwent one of its own numerous reorganizations. The rest of the album was recorded by an assortment of Memphis musicians. The result was serviceable period instrumental soul-funk, occasionally creeping into psychedelia (especially on the nine-minute "Cloud Nine," with several minutes of weird screams and whispers). It's an oddity in the Stax discography, related to the rest of the Mar-Keys' releases in name only, and not worth paying attention to unless you're determined to track down every available Stax recording. The album was combined with the 1969 Mar-Keys LP Damifiknow! onto a single-CD reissue in 1994.

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900.00 ฿

The Dramatics ‎– Joy Ride

Review by Craig Lytle
Joy Ride featured three singles, the first being the dance track "Finger Fever." Ron Banks and L.J. Reynolds co-lead this gritty number with its multi-directional arrangement. The single peaked at number 23 on the R&B charts. The second release was the classic "Be My Girl." Simultaneously released with Michael Henderson's version, the Detroit quintet is in superior form on this soulful number. In addition to being the author of the song, Henderson also produced the Dramatics' version, which peaked at number three on the R&B charts. The final release was the grieving ballad "I Can't Get Over." Reynolds gives a breathtaking performance with his explosive baritone. This single also made the Billboard R&B Top Ten at number nine. While side one is more dance-oriented with moderately paced compositions, side two is more ballad-seasoned with mellow numbers. The group's sleek lead and background vocals remain consistent on every track, and not having any obvious album fillers is also a plus.

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800.00 ฿

20th Century Steel Band ‎– Warm Heart Cold Steel

On it the band translated soul classics such as Shaft and Papa Was A Rolling Stone to the steel drums, often extending the tunes into laidback jams that are a pleasure to listen to.

This could’ve sunk without a trace but the set’s Heaven And Hell, heavily sampled by the likes of Jennifer Lopez, Black Eyed Peas and LL Cool J, has helped keep the name alive. A welcome reissue.

(Mr Bongo)

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800.00 ฿

Various ‎– Jazz Is Alive And Well On CTI And KUDU

Produced by Creed Taylor
Featuring Hank Crawford, Deodato, Hubert Laws, Stanley Turrentine, Freddie Hubbard, Esther Phillips, Johnny Hammond, George Benson and Grover Washington, Jr.

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1,000.00 ฿

Stan Clarke‎– Children Of Forever

Stanley Clarke's debut solo effort was issued when he was already a seasoned jazz veteran, and a member of Chick Corea's Return to Forever, which at the time of this recording also included Joe Farrell on soprano sax and flute, and the Brazilian team of vocalist Flora Purim and drummer/percussionist Airto Moreira. Produced by Corea, who plays Rhodes, clavinet, and acoustic piano on Children of Forever, the band included flutist Art Webb, then-new RtF drummer Lenny White, guitarist Pat Martino, and a vocal pairing between the inimitable Andy Bey and Dee Dee Bridgewater on three of the five cuts -- Bey appears on four. Clarke plays both electric and acoustic bass on the set; and while it would be easy to simply look at this recording as an early fusion date, that would be a tragic mistake. If anything, Children of Forever is a true cousin to Norman Connors' classic Dance of Magic and Dark of Light albums, which were also released in 1973; Clarke played bass on both. This is basically funky, spiritual jazz in the best sense. Yes, jazz. That wonderfully mercurial, indefinable force that brings into itself the whole of music, from popular to classical and folk forms, and makes something new out of them. The long title track with its killer vocal interplay between Bridgewater and Bey is seductive from the jump. Add Clarke's big fat bassline, which is mellow and meaty at the beginning, but after the long piano and guitar breaks in the middle becomes dirty, fuzzy, and spacy by the end as the cut leans into souled-out funk.

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1,200.00 ฿

Max Roach ‎– Drums Unlimited

Review by Scott Yanow
Other than a trio set with the legendary pianist Hasaan Ibn Ali, this set was Max Roach's only recording as a leader during 1963-67. Three of the six numbers ("Nommo," "St. Louis Blues" and "In the Red") find Roach heading a group that includes trumpeter Freddie Hubbard, altoist James Spaulding, pianist Ronnie Mathews, bassist Jymie Merritt and, on "St. Louis Blues," Roland Alexander on soprano. Their music is essentially advanced hard-bop with a generous amount of space taken up by Roach's drum solos. The other three selections ("The Drum Also Waltzes," "Drums Unlimited" and "For Big Sid") are unaccompanied features for Max Roach and because of the melodic and logically-planned nature of his improvisations, they continually hold on to one's attention.

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1,000.00 ฿

Herbie Hancock ‎– Man-Child

Perhaps the funkiest album of Herbie Hancock's early- to mid-'70s jazz/funk/fusion era, Man-Child starts off with the unforgettable "Hang Up Your Hang Ups," and the beat just keeps coming until the album's end. "Sun Touch" and "Bubbles" are slower, but funky nonetheless. Hancock is the star on his arsenal of keyboards, but guitarist Wah Wah Watson's presence is what puts a new sheen on this recording, distinguishing it from its predecessors, Head Hunters and Thrust. Others among the all-star cast of soloists and accompanists include Wayne Shorter on soprano sax, Stevie Wonder on chromatic harmonica, and longtime Hancock cohort Bennie Maupin on an arsenal of woodwinds.

Review by Jim Newsom

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1,200.00 ฿

Norman Connors ‎– Dark Of Light

This is in the stone groove of earlier Connors delights -- New York club music, the nexus where disco and jazz collided and gave birth to a brassy sort of funk. Players abound here: Herbie Hancock, Cecil McBee, Gary Bartz, and Stanley Clarke, to name but a few. Soon after this, Connors had some hits and started making records he figured his "public" wanted to hear.
Review by Rob Ferrier

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800.00 ฿

Booker T. Jones / Booker T. And The M.G.'s ‎– Up Tight (Music From The Score Of The Motion Picture)

Review by Steve Kurutz
Through the score of Booker T. Jones, the soundtrack to the 1968 Jules Dassin movie Uptight reflects the story of a young black man living in the ghetto during the turbulent time after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Containing the hit single "Time Is Tight," the soundtrack moves from soft and contemplative ("Children, Don't Get Weary") to driving and urgent ("Run Tank Run"). Though not one of Booker T. & the MG's' better albums, Uptight does contain the always exemplary musicianship that the MG's brought to their records, and it predates both the Superfly and Shaft soundtracks by three years.

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1,400.00 ฿

Bernard Wright ‎– 'Nard

Like Tom Browne and Lenny White/Twennynine, Bernard Wright was part of Jamaica, Queens' R&B/funk scene of the late 1970s and early 1980s, which gave us such major hits as Twennynine's "Peanut Butter" and Browne's "Funkin' for Jamaica." Browne and White were both talented jazz musicians, but R&B/funk was their main focus at that time. Similarly, keyboardist/pianist Wright occasionally flirts with instrumental jazz on his debut album, 'Nard, but pays a lot more attention to vocal-oriented soul and funk. The only instrumentals on this out-of-print LP are the jazz-funk smoker "Firebolt Hustle," the Rodney Franklin-ish "Bread Sandwiches," and a relaxed interpretation of Miles Davis' "Solar," which finds Wright forming an acoustic piano trio with bassist Buster Williams and drummer Roy Haynes. Otherwise, this is an R&B album that is defined by such impressive funk as "Spinnin'," "Master Rocker," and the goofy but wildly infectious "Haboglabotribin'." Recorded when the keyboardist/pianist was only 16, 'Nard was expected to be a big hit, but surprisingly, didn't fare as well as albums by Browne and White.
Review by Alex Henderson

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1,200.00 ฿

King Jammys Dancehall 2: Digital Roots & Hard Dancehall 1984-1991

Dub Store Records’ compilation series mainly focuses on bringing together the very best heavyweight dancehall tunes from Jammys released during the digital phase of reggae music. “King Jammy’s Dancehall Part 2”, subtitled “Digital Roots & Hard Dancehall 1984-1991” contains fifteen serieus cuts from vocalists and deejays as well as five dub versions.

Just like Part 1, this second compilation gets started with the Crownprince of Reggae, Dennis Brown. The 1985 released lovers lament “History” shows that he’s able to handle the digi riddim in a totally satisfying way. Another example is the sizzling “Tracks Of Life”, which comes across a heavy digital remake of the Studio One classic “Swing Easy”. Dennis Brown’s opener is followed by Cornell Campbell’s beautifully sung “Nothing Don’t Come Easy” from 1987, a real killer and one of the most popular and rare tunes among record collectors. Another digi killer is Admiral Tibet’s “Victim Of Babylon”, voiced over a jaunty riddim with s rough and tough bassline. Obviously the Wailing Souls didn’t record that much in the digital dancehall era, but almost everything they did for King Jammy was well worth hearing. The compatibility of their time-honed harmonies and hard digital instrumentation is very surprising as can be fully experienced when listening to their big tune “Move On”.

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1,000.00 ฿

Jimmy Radway & The Fe Me Time All Stars ‎– Dub I

Jimmy Radway’s anguished emotive early seventies productions on his Fe Me Time and Capricorn labels deserve to be as highly regarded as those of his contemporaries Niney and Bunny Lee. Thankfully, Pressure Sounds have selected him for re-evaluation with a reissue of his 1975 album Dub I. It’s a strong set of versions to his classic sides on these imprints by Leroy Smart, Errol Dunkley, Big Youth, Desmond Young and others including 5 bonus tracks.

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1,100.00 ฿

Leon Thomas ‎– Gold Sunrise On Magic Mountain

Even before his tenure with Pharoah Sanders, Santana and Archie Shepp, avant garde jazz vocalist Leon Thomas was a force to be reckoned with. Recorded live on June 18, 1971 at the Montreaux Jazz Festival, this performance showcases Tomas's ability to wow and amaze.

Occupying a precarious position between jazz and the occult, Thomas's performance is both pithy and wild. This probably has to do with the environment it was recorded in. When Thomas sings, "It's five o'clock in the morning," he isn't just reciting the standard blues lyrics - it actually was five o'clock in the morning. Regardless, the audience that had been crowded into the smoke filled casino since eight the previous evening was still eager for more only to be stopped by festival officials who had to pull the plug.

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800.00 ฿

Benson & Farrell ‎– Benson & Farrell

This little-known CTI recording matches guitarist George Benson and Joe Farrell, a multi-reed player who mostly sticks to flute. Joined by a large rhythm section and sometimes two other flutists (including Eddie Daniels), Benson and Farrell play four originals by session arranger Dave Matthews, plus the standard "Old Devil Moon." This pleasing if not all that memorable instrumental date was recorded right after Benson's Breezin' (and before its release), ending the guitarist's CTI period right before he became a vocal star.
Review by Scott Yanow

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1,300.00 ฿

Freda Payne ‎– Reaching Out

Beautiful and powerful soul album by Freda Payne.
A good listen all the way through.
Kind of an essential Classic.

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